Where Did The Woven Dental Floss Go?

Many dentists and dental hygienists recommend woven dental floss for our patients.  Its fibrous texture does a great job of removing the plaque which can cause irritated gums, which we call gingivitis, and bone loss around the teeth, which we call gum disease.  For years, the best, and possibly only, woven dental floss on the market was Reach Gentle Gum Care.  But in the past few years, it’s been getting harder and harder to find in the stores. Well, it appears that Johnson and Johnson has moved woven dental floss from its Reach division to its Listerine division.  They’ve kept the same basic name (now it’s called Listerine Gentle Gum Care).  It has the same woven texture, which is most important.  And it still says it’s mint flavored on the packaging.  But it’s a different “mint” flavor than the Reach version.  It has what some describe as a cinnamon flavor to it.  And  it no longer contains fluoride, which isn’t really a very big deal. So if you’ve been looking for the woven dental floss that many dentists and dental hygienists recommend, look no more for Reach.  Instead, look for Listerine Gentle Gum Care.  If you don’t see it in your local market or Target, ask the manager if they can order some.  The more people who ask for it, the easier it will be to find in the future. Dr. Steve Roseville Family Dentist Steven...

Topical Anesthetic Gel For Teething Babies? FDA says NO!

The FDA recently recommended not using topical anesthetics containing lidocaine to treat infants and children with teething pain .  In 2011, they recommended against using topical anesthetics containing benzocaine.  Since pretty much all topical anesthetics contain either lidocaine or benzocaine, they recommend parents and caregivers not to use topical medications for teething pain.  This includes Anbesol, Hurricaine, Orajel, Baby Orajel, Orabase, and various store brands. Instead, parents and caregivers should follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations for treating teething pain: Use a teething ring chilled in the refrigerator (not frozen). Gently rub or massage the child’s gums with your finger to relieve the symptoms. Adults who use topical anesthetics should be careful not to swallow any more than is absolutely unavoidable. Contact me if you have any questions. Dr. Steve Dr. Steve Dr. Steven Lee graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1985. He was a dental examiner on the National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES III). And he is the leader of the American River Study Club. Dr. Lee has been practicing general dentistry in Roseville CA for the last 18...

New App To Make Toothbrushing Fun For Kids!

There’s a brand new app called Toothsavers Brushing Game.  The Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives (a group of 36 organizations, including the American Dental Association, recognized as experts in the field of oral health) created it to encourage kids to brush for a full two minutes twice a day. You can find out more about it here.  And if you want to try out the game online, you can do so here. The app is available for download on both Apple and Android devices. So give it a try and get your kids brushing! Dr. SteveRoseville Family Dentist Dr. Steve Dr. Steven Lee graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1985. He was a dental examiner on the National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES III). And he is the leader of the American River Study Club. Dr. Lee has been practicing general dentistry in Roseville CA for the last 18...

Dental Treatment OK During Pregnancy

Back in 1985, when I graduated from UCLA Dental School, dentists were taught that we should postpone all non-critical dental treatment until after delivery of the baby. Any emergency dental treatment of infected teeth should be done right away. And any critical, but not yet infected teeth, should be treated during the second trimester to avoid possibly affecting the critical development times for the fetus during the first and third trimesters. The thinking was that, even though there is no evidence that anything we do (including local anesthetic and x-rays) has been shown to harm a developing fetus, it is better to be safe and err on the side of caution. Since then, however, doctors and dentists have become convinced of the safety and importance of dental care during pregnancy. In July of this year, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) issued new recommendations stating that teeth cleanings and dental X-rays are safe for pregnant women. “We can all reassure our patients that routine teeth cleanings, dental X-rays, and local anesthesia are safe during pregnancy”. They also state, “Pregnancy is not a reason to delay root canals or filling cavities if they are needed because putting off treatment may lead to further complications. One potential benefit of improving a woman’s oral health: It may decrease the transmission of cavity-causing bacteria from mother to baby. This can help lessen the future risk of cavities in children.” In August, the Oral Health Care During Pregnancy Advisory Committee (made up of representatives of ACOG, ADA, and other organizations) came up with a more comprehensive list of recommendations, including the following:...

Surgeon General Dr. Regina Benjamin Endorses Fluoridation

Yesterday, our surgeon general officially endorsed community water fluoridation.  According to the American Dental Association, “Every surgeon general for the past 50 years has endorsed community water fluoridation of community water supplies as a safe and effective weapon in the war against tooth decay.” Dr. Regina Benjamin was quoted as saying, “Fluoridation’s effectiveness in preventing tooth decay is not limited to children, but extends throughout life, resulting in fewer and less severe cavities.” She further noted, “each generation born since the implementation of water fluoridation has enjoyed better dental health than the generation that preceded it.” We realize that there are many people who opposed community water fluoridation for a variety of reasons.  But if you look at the entire body of scientific evidence, the overwhelming majority of it supports  fluoridation as safe and effective.  According to Dr. Benjamin, water fluoridation is “one of the most effective choices communities can make to prevent health problems while actually improving the oral health of their citizens.” Dr. Steve Roseville Family Dentist Dr. Steve Dr. Steven Lee graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1985. He was a dental examiner on the National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES III). And he is the leader of the American River Study Club. Dr. Lee has been practicing general dentistry in Roseville CA for the last 18...

Artificial Joints- Do I Need To Take Antibiotics Before Dental Treatment?

Many people with prosthetic hips and knee joints have been taking antibiotics before dental treatment on the advice of their Orthopedic Surgeons.  They were afraid that the bacteria in the mouth could get into the bloodstream and infect the artificial joints, which could lead to having to replace the joint.  Some people were told to premedicate with antibiotics before dental visits for two years after their joint surgery.  Others were told they must do it for the rest of their lives.  If dental work leads to infected prosthetic joints, then it would surely be wise to take antibiotics before dental visits.  But does it? The American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) completed a systemic review of the literature last month and came up with the following recommendations: 1- “The practitioner might consider discontinuing the practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotics for patients with hip and knee prosthetic joint implants undergoing dental procedures.” 2- “We are unable to recommend for or against the use of topical oral antimicrobials in patients with prosthetic joint implants or other orthopaedic implants undergoing dental procedures.” 3- “In the absence of reliable evidence linking poor oral health to prosthetic joint infection, it is the opinion of the work group that patients with prosthetic joint implants or other orthopaedic implants maintain appropriate oral hygiene.” HUH?  What does this all mean?  Here’s my interpretation: 1- There is no evidence that dental treatment causes joint infections, but they’d like to see more studies done before they stick their necks out and actually say it doesn’t.  So, doctors might not want to give patients antibiotics before...