A Dental Christmas Poem For This Holiday Season

‘Twas the night before Christmas, and down in the mouthThe tongue was ‘a stirring, the teeth heading South.Their owner was indulging in holiday treats,At all times of the day, eating sugary eats. So the sugar bugs ate all the candies and cookies,All the chocolates and sodas in the crannies and nookies.They pooped gooey acid, and made rotten cavitiesOh how awful it was, such dental depravities! Now the moral is this, listen close and rememberThat during this most festive month of DecemberDo not feed the sugar bugs all day and all nightHappy Christmas to all, and to all a good bite! Dr. Steve Roseville Family Dentist Dr. Steve Dr. Steven Lee graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1985. He was a dental examiner on the National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES III). And he is the leader of the American River Study Club. Dr. Lee has been practicing general dentistry in Roseville CA for the last 18...

Affordable Dental Care For Seniors

“Getting old is not for sissies.”  One of the many challenges facing our growing senior population is how do we keep our teeth and gums healthy through our golden years?  When we retire and lose our health insurance, Medicare is there to pick up the slack for medical issues.  But basic Medicare does not cover dental issues.  In addition, as we age, our salivary glands slow down making us more susceptible to tooth decay.  So how do we keep our teeth and gums dentally healthy on a limited retiree budget? The Huffington Post posted a good blog on the subject today.  In it, they discuss options including Medicare Advantage (Part C), Veterans benefits, and dental schools as options.  For those on low income, they recommend contacting your local dental society, or checking with the Dental Lifeline Network which provides free dental care for low-income elderly and disabled, or look for a privately funded free clinic. Of course, the best way to keep your teeth and gums dentally healthy as we age is to practice good dental health habits: avoid foods with sugar between mealtimes, floss and brush daily along the gum line, and keep up with routine checkups and cleanings at your dentist.  And if you do need some dental treatment, ask your dentist about the pros and cons of all treatment options.  A good dentist will take into consideration what dental treatment is appropriate for someone of your age and health status, as well as your values and financial means.  For example, if you have multiple teeth which need to be replaced, partial dentures can be much less expensive...

Topical Anesthetic Gel For Teething Babies? FDA says NO!

The FDA recently recommended not using topical anesthetics containing lidocaine to treat infants and children with teething pain .  In 2011, they recommended against using topical anesthetics containing benzocaine.  Since pretty much all topical anesthetics contain either lidocaine or benzocaine, they recommend parents and caregivers not to use topical medications for teething pain.  This includes Anbesol, Hurricaine, Orajel, Baby Orajel, Orabase, and various store brands. Instead, parents and caregivers should follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations for treating teething pain: Use a teething ring chilled in the refrigerator (not frozen). Gently rub or massage the child’s gums with your finger to relieve the symptoms. Adults who use topical anesthetics should be careful not to swallow any more than is absolutely unavoidable. Contact me if you have any questions. Dr. Steve Dr. Steve Dr. Steven Lee graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1985. He was a dental examiner on the National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES III). And he is the leader of the American River Study Club. Dr. Lee has been practicing general dentistry in Roseville CA for the last 18...

New App To Make Toothbrushing Fun For Kids!

There’s a brand new app called Toothsavers Brushing Game.  The Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives (a group of 36 organizations, including the American Dental Association, recognized as experts in the field of oral health) created it to encourage kids to brush for a full two minutes twice a day. You can find out more about it here.  And if you want to try out the game online, you can do so here. The app is available for download on both Apple and Android devices. So give it a try and get your kids brushing! Dr. SteveRoseville Family Dentist Dr. Steve Dr. Steven Lee graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1985. He was a dental examiner on the National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES III). And he is the leader of the American River Study Club. Dr. Lee has been practicing general dentistry in Roseville CA for the last 18...

Dental Treatment OK During Pregnancy

Back in 1985, when I graduated from UCLA Dental School, dentists were taught that we should postpone all non-critical dental treatment until after delivery of the baby. Any emergency dental treatment of infected teeth should be done right away. And any critical, but not yet infected teeth, should be treated during the second trimester to avoid possibly affecting the critical development times for the fetus during the first and third trimesters. The thinking was that, even though there is no evidence that anything we do (including local anesthetic and x-rays) has been shown to harm a developing fetus, it is better to be safe and err on the side of caution. Since then, however, doctors and dentists have become convinced of the safety and importance of dental care during pregnancy. In July of this year, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) issued new recommendations stating that teeth cleanings and dental X-rays are safe for pregnant women. “We can all reassure our patients that routine teeth cleanings, dental X-rays, and local anesthesia are safe during pregnancy”. They also state, “Pregnancy is not a reason to delay root canals or filling cavities if they are needed because putting off treatment may lead to further complications. One potential benefit of improving a woman’s oral health: It may decrease the transmission of cavity-causing bacteria from mother to baby. This can help lessen the future risk of cavities in children.” In August, the Oral Health Care During Pregnancy Advisory Committee (made up of representatives of ACOG, ADA, and other organizations) came up with a more comprehensive list of recommendations, including the following:...